Growing Hope Against The Odds

In schools today educators are pulled in many directions and with so many mandates are left with very little autonomy. The class sizes are growing, the students needs are never-ending, mandates continue to come down the pipeline and laws are constantly changing forcing teachers to change and adapt the new demands.

Somewhere in the midst of this teachers do what they do best, teach. Teaching isn’t as easy as bestowing knowledge upon a child as some people may think. They can’t simply open up their heads and pour in information. There are so many conditions that have to be in place for learning to occur, real learning that is. Real learning? That would be the processing of new information, connecting it to something the child already knows and filing it away to future use (not just regurgitation on the next formative assessment).

hope

How can we teach so that real learning can happen? What conditions are needed? Can we even control the conditions? Unfortunately there are things that are out of reach of the teachers. Lack of sleep, problems at home, stress from life outside of school, etc. are a few things that may weigh on the bodies and minds of children which we can only to our best to mitigate. So what do we do then? As a school feeding the students breakfast helps, encouraging the students to get rest albeit isn’t easy but can also help but most importantly the teachers can be there for the students.

Having a healthy relationship with an trusted adult can help a child. (Notice I said healthy, boundaries are there for a reason). Students need to know that you care. This can be very challenging with large class sizes. Knowing students names is one thing, knowing the students themselves is another. Getting to know them individually as a person and building rapport is very important. They don’t know what you know until they know that you care!

Once you know the students you are more aware of what base knowledge they have, what interests them, what they like and can use those things to help them engage in the learning process. Again , this is very difficult when teachers must ‘cover’ material quickly to keep pace with a curriculum schedule because each child is unique and requires effort on the part of the teacher to ensure each child is engaged in the lesson/activity.

Another piece required to providing an optimal environment is providing students opportunities to support one another in the learning process. Do your students feel that their classmates want them to do well? Do your students feel they have classmates who care about them? Would they notice if they were absent? If the answers to these questions are ‘No’ you have work to do. Many classrooms are competitive as most students see it as ‘every student for themselves.’ This isolates the kids and inhibits a positive classroom environment. Teachers providing students opportunities to work together, support one another in goals as a class as well as individually creates a positive and supportive environment.

You may be asking yourself why in the world teachers would ‘waste’ their time building relationships/rapport with students and helping students support one another?? Why? Because doing those things is critical to building student engagement and growing hope both of which are absolutely necessary for lifelong success. These crucial pieces provide students an optimal learning environment to build persistence, resilience, a life-long love of learning and pave a path of success that spreads beyond the walls of the classroom.

Are you growing hope in your classroom? Do you feel your child is in a classroom environment that fosters hope?

Don’t believe me? Check out these resources to learn more!

The Hope Survey

The Hope Survey Supporting Research

Assessing What Really Matters in Schools: Creating hope for the future

Hope and Academic Success in College

Activating the Desire to Learn

Hope Theory: Rainbows in the Mind

Here’s Hoping

What is Hope and How Can We Measure It

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Walk a mile in their shoes…

Ah yes, it’s happened again. Never fails…someone asks a loaded question or makes a polarizing statement on some type of social media outlet and for some dumb reason I read the responses despite knowing I will soon be irritated. I know, I should just NOT read them but yet I am compelled to click.

What is it this time? Educational items..Yup, banging that drum again. A local news station had posted a question seeking feedback from their viewers as to whether or not cursive should be taught in schools. I know, I got sucked in just as they wanted. I didn’t plan to respond to read the other comments. 90% of the comments were what I would categorize as ‘ignorant’ and 10% put some thought into it and had some type of experience with the situation (i.e., students in school, children or in schools).

What really bothers me is how many people demanded that this ‘subject’ be taught in schools and even made comments on how schools have all gone down hill. Why is it that so many feel they know better than those in education? Spouting off that schools need to make time for cursive just as every other subject?? Complaining about what is or isn’t taught that has nothing to do with the original question…Everyone seems to feel they’d do a better job teaching. Everyone’s a critic right? 🙂

I know, I know, they feel they can give their 2 cents (or in many cases $20) worth of advice because it’s public education…but it’s so over played. The number of times a students has told me, “I pay your salary you know!” -Ug

One of the 10% who actually had some experience with education mentioned the national common core state standards. Yup, my favorite (insert sarcastic voice and eye roll here). And the response someone else gave was to add cursive to that list of standards!?!?! Really? Ha! As much as I would have loved to respond to the comments I didn’t. I need far more characters to do it and I can just imagine the back and forth comments that would ensue.

One of the comments pleaded not to judge until you’ve walked a mile in the teachers shoes and I must agree. I think the entire list of folks who commented have no clue who actually decides what is taught it schools nor do they understand there are so many hours in the day (and children’s attention spans are not very long).

My ‘Menne Thoughts’ on the whole comment craze:

  • Volunteer in a school: See what the days are like, what the kids are taught, what they actually retain and what they enjoy learning.
  • Talk to your local elected officials: I don’t care if it’s the local school board or a state representative. Talk to them to see what they know about what is being taught it schools and if they have visited any lately?
  • Talk to kids: Ask kids what they feel they are learning in schools and what THEY feel is important. Do they have time to play and be a kid? Do they enjoy school? Why or why not?
  • Judge not, lest we be judged: Think of what it would be like to be in a teachers shoes. Someone far removed from the classroom tells them what to teach and in many instances how to teach it. They have classes FILLED to the brim with students of varying abilities. (Many of the teachers are judged and compensated based on how well these students perform on standardized assessments. I know many people feel it’s just like a business. You have employees and you train them and you are judged on how well they perform. In education you can NOT fire (nor do teachers want to) students who don’t perform well. ) They have limited time during the day to get all of the mandated subjects scheduled and then the challenge of actually teaching them in such a manner that the kids can understand and retain the material. Oh, and it’s a plus if they can instill character traits and spark a love of learning.

In education we do the best that we can with the resources we are provided. We are under constant fire from many angles but we keep on keeping on. We are in the business of education because we care about kids. ❤

Things my kids say continued….

The “eeyaa’s”

We’ve all been there. Kids are sleeping soundly, you’ve had a little time to get some things done and now you are off to dreamland yourself. All of the sudden you are awake and hearing “Mommy” or “Daddy!”

We may hear “Moooom” or “Daaaaaaaaaaad.”  Sometimes even “Mommy” or “Daddy.” At some point our oldest decided he couldn’t holler loud enough and he put his own spin on “Mom” or “Dad.” He started bellowing  “Dadddeeeyaaaaa.” Occasionally we’d hear a “Mommmeeeeya.” (for whatever reason the kids seem to want Daddy at night).

We caught onto the “ee-ya” addition but didn’t think too much of it. We asked why he does it and he said “Mom and Dad are just too short to yell. I need a longer name and adding “ee-ya” works well.”

Now that our youngest is in the ‘chatty-patty’ phase of life I have noticed he too has adopted this “ee-ya” stuff. He now yells any and all of his siblings names with the ‘eeya’ ending. At 22 months he’s already figured out that it’s effective In getting the work out.

The End & Amen

My youngest 2 seem to really catch on to prayers and as soon as they could speak said, “Amen” at the end of prayers. So much so and so loudly that at gatherings such as a recent beautiful wedding they say it so loud that everyone can hear them. It’s not a bad thing, just funny when a 22 month old can out “Amen” an adult. The funny part is they have understood it to mean closure to something so when we finish reading books at storytime they both end books with a boasting “Amen” rather than “The End.” A funny and cute trait they’ve picked up along the way.

Pimple in Your Eye

I just love to listen to my older 2 converse about all kinds of things. The other day they were talking about how their bodies work and one said to the other, “What is that dot in your eye?” The response was very matter-of-fact, “It’s your pimple silly!” I had to laugh and clear up their confusion and let them know it’s a pupil not a pimple.