Walk a mile in their shoes…

Ah yes, it’s happened again. Never fails…someone asks a loaded question or makes a polarizing statement on some type of social media outlet and for some dumb reason I read the responses despite knowing I will soon be irritated. I know, I should just NOT read them but yet I am compelled to click.

What is it this time? Educational items..Yup, banging that drum again. A local news station had posted a question seeking feedback from their viewers as to whether or not cursive should be taught in schools. I know, I got sucked in just as they wanted. I didn’t plan to respond to read the other comments. 90% of the comments were what I would categorize as ‘ignorant’ and 10% put some thought into it and had some type of experience with the situation (i.e., students in school, children or in schools).

What really bothers me is how many people demanded that this ‘subject’ be taught in schools and even made comments on how schools have all gone down hill. Why is it that so many feel they know better than those in education? Spouting off that schools need to make time for cursive just as every other subject?? Complaining about what is or isn’t taught that has nothing to do with the original question…Everyone seems to feel they’d do a better job teaching. Everyone’s a critic right? 🙂

I know, I know, they feel they can give their 2 cents (or in many cases $20) worth of advice because it’s public education…but it’s so over played. The number of times a students has told me, “I pay your salary you know!” -Ug

One of the 10% who actually had some experience with education mentioned the national common core state standards. Yup, my favorite (insert sarcastic voice and eye roll here). And the response someone else gave was to add cursive to that list of standards!?!?! Really? Ha! As much as I would have loved to respond to the comments I didn’t. I need far more characters to do it and I can just imagine the back and forth comments that would ensue.

One of the comments pleaded not to judge until you’ve walked a mile in the teachers shoes and I must agree. I think the entire list of folks who commented have no clue who actually decides what is taught it schools nor do they understand there are so many hours in the day (and children’s attention spans are not very long).

My ‘Menne Thoughts’ on the whole comment craze:

  • Volunteer in a school: See what the days are like, what the kids are taught, what they actually retain and what they enjoy learning.
  • Talk to your local elected officials: I don’t care if it’s the local school board or a state representative. Talk to them to see what they know about what is being taught it schools and if they have visited any lately?
  • Talk to kids: Ask kids what they feel they are learning in schools and what THEY feel is important. Do they have time to play and be a kid? Do they enjoy school? Why or why not?
  • Judge not, lest we be judged: Think of what it would be like to be in a teachers shoes. Someone far removed from the classroom tells them what to teach and in many instances how to teach it. They have classes FILLED to the brim with students of varying abilities. (Many of the teachers are judged and compensated based on how well these students perform on standardized assessments. I know many people feel it’s just like a business. You have employees and you train them and you are judged on how well they perform. In education you can NOT fire (nor do teachers want to) students who don’t perform well. ) They have limited time during the day to get all of the mandated subjects scheduled and then the challenge of actually teaching them in such a manner that the kids can understand and retain the material. Oh, and it’s a plus if they can instill character traits and spark a love of learning.

In education we do the best that we can with the resources we are provided. We are under constant fire from many angles but we keep on keeping on. We are in the business of education because we care about kids. ❤

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The Principals Protest

As an avid user of social media I tend to follow various news articles and trending topics so it is no surprise that I read the New York Times article on education entitled “Principals Protest Role of Testing in Evaluations.” This, as well as other articles, seem to dominate the tweets I was reading last week. After having read it I can’t say I disagree with the protest. If I was in their shoes I would be outraged as well. (Then again, that is one of the MANY reasons I have chosen to leave the traditional school system for a different and more innovative public school system which allows for more autonomy.) Having said that, I find it ironic. The very same high stakes standardized tests were deemed acceptable to evaluate students but now that they they are proposed to evaluate the teachers and administrators there is a protest. Like I said, I don’t disagree that is is wrong to use these test scores to evaluate the teachers and administrators. I just wish this protest would have started years ago when the high stakes testing era began. We as educators and parents should have been protesting the use of high stakes standardized tests to evaluate the students. In my experience research shows that test scores predict future test scores not what kind of person the child will become. Many kids score poorly on exams (for various reasons) and overcome the obstacles to become very successful and amazing people as adults.

Teachers and administrators shouldn’t be evaluated based on a snapshot of their students on one particular day and neither should the students. Students, teachers, and administrators should ALL be evaluated with a more comprehensive approach.